David Ireland

Tell us a little about yourself and your role?David

Originally a nurse working within the M&A Sector I moved into the murky world of Information, outcomes collection, KPI’s and all things PRIMHD. This was primarily at Waikato FHB while also being involved in a number of national groups such as the PRIMHD Working group.

My current role as the Midland Clinical Workstation Coordinator is aimed at supporting the 5 DHB provider Arm services to implement the new regional Clinical Portal that is being developed. It involves working with groups from the DHB’s in defining the requirements, agreeing on standard processes and clinical documentation.

Working regionally is vastly different from working locally – what is one thing you have learnt working across multiple streams, cultures, personalities etc?

I think that one major thing is that everybody wants what is best service delivery possible so that we support service users on their journey. The only difference is that each area seems to do things slightly differently which creates variations. In saying that some of the variations helps to meet the specific needs of local populations so is valuable.

What projects are you currently working on and how do you see this benefiting the region? 

I am currently working on getting regionally agreed clinical documentation utilising the clinical champions groups that have been set up within each DHB.

Along with this I am also providing support as required to DHB’s in understanding the murky world of Mental Health Information and how this can be used to help improve service delivery and outcomes for service users.

If there was one thing you could change in MH&A what would that be?

Probably the hardest question there is actually but if I look at the area I work in more specifically it would probably be to be able for everybody including service users, and clinicians to have access to the most up to date information all the time.

What is your favourite “whakatauki – words of wisdom”?

Family comes first – how you define family is up to you.

 

Ashley Bajaj

Tell us a little about yourself and your role?Ashley.jpg

I am the Decision Support Coordinator for the Midland MH&A and have held this   position for 2 years. My role entails supporting NGOs with fulfilling their   reporting requirements and implementing changes introduced by the MoH. I also   produce reports for the Midland Clinical Governance and Maori GM to spark the   conversations at a local level backed up with data.

Working regionally is vastly different from working locally – what is one thing you have learnt working across multiple streams, cultures, personalities etc?

Working   regionally can be challenging in terms of obtaining agreement from all   stakeholder groups. By the same token once agreement is gained it is   rewarding to see the region progress towards one common goal.

What projects are you currently working on and how do you see this benefiting the region? 

My priority is to finalise the mapping documents for all Midland NGOs to reflect NCAMP July 2016 changes. This is of paramount importance because the document details all the active contract lines and the corresponding PRIMHD codes essential for meeting the contractual obligation.

If there was one thing you could change in MH&A what would that be?

Remembering to keep the client at the centre of all our efforts. It sometimes becomes all about the policy and procedure and not about the person or their families we are here to serve.

What is your favourite “whakatauki – words of wisdom”?

We have come too far, not to go further...

We have done too much, not to do more…

 

Nathalie Esaiah-Tiatia

Tell us a little about yourself and your role?nathalie.jpg

I live in New Plymouth and work in our virtual team across the Midland region.

I still hold my Practice Certificate within the scope of Workforce Planning and Development.  I have a Registered Nurse background, starting in the Taranaki District Health Board, New Grad Programme 1995, then I went to Medical before moving to Mental Health.

My role as Midland Workforce Planning Lead Mental Health & Addiction means I support the planning and development of systems and supports, provide support to clinical networks and work with DHBs, NGOs and national workforce centres to build capacity and capability of the health workforce.  I enjoy working to build, strengthen and maintain professional relationships that are meaningful.

Working regionally is vastly different from working locally – what is one thing you have learnt working across multiple streams, cultures, personalities etc?

I’ve learnt that despite differences, people want what’s best for the people in their community; often what this looks like is the same.  Its all about valuing relationships.

What projects are you currently working on and how do you see this benefiting the region? 

  • I’ve completed the draft District Wide Workforce Plan reports (one regional report and five local reports) – this work was new to the sector and the region.  Midland region is the only region moving forward with District Wide Workforce Plan Workshops.
  • I always enjoy supporting the MR OST Clinical Network (Hamilton) 13 September 2016.
  • I’ve also come to the end of supporting Regional Clinical Networks for 2016 finishing with MR Infant Perinatal Clinical Network (Hamilton) 15 September 2016.
  • I attended the first MR SACAT Workshop (Hamilton) 20 September 2016.
  • I attended the ‘Seminar on Māori Intergenerational Trauma and Healing (Hamilton) 3 October 2016 hosted by Te Atawhai o Te Ao, Te Kotahi Research Institute and the He Kokonga Whare Research Team.  It was good to see Te Rau Matatini and Te Pou supporting this seminar by attending. 
  • I’m looking forward to Supporting CEP Follow Up Advanced Practitioners workshop (Hamilton) tomorrow 5 October 2016..
  • I hope to see you at the MOH NGO Forum Health and Disability Sector National Forum (Wellington) next week 12 October 2016.
  • It’s that time of the year for Quarterly Reports, so I’m working on mine.

The above are ways to bring the sector together to share knowledge and skills, while building the capacity and capability of the MH&A workforce.  People working in the sector are passionate about their work and are great people doing there best to provide a quality service with less resources.  Well done Midland Mental Health and Addiction!

If there was one thing you could change in MH&A what would that be?

I would like to remove all barriers to progress workforce planning and development.

What is your favourite “whakatauki – words of wisdom”?

He Tupuna he mokopuna

He mokopuna he Tupuna

 

Akatu Marsters

Tell us a little about yourself and your role?akatu.jpg

My family has worked in the tourism sector for over 100years leaving a legacy for all generations that followed in Whakarewarewa village, a path that I followed which included various roles such as guiding, cultural performances, administration, accounts and office management.

My current role is Senior Administrator and I ensure everything is running effectively for the regional network team and our stakeholders.

Working regionally is vastly different from working locally – what is one thing you have learnt working across multiple streams, cultures, personalities etc?

Having a background in tourism, customer service is of utmost importance I tend to apply this same skill when working across the region and treat people how I want to be treated.

What projects are you currently working on and how do you see this benefiting the region? 

Sitting alongside the team I have my hand in the pie of all the projects that are being delivered by the regional network.  All projects we deliver are inclusive of the regional stakeholders and the sector to bring all voices to the table.  It is beneficial to individuals and organisations when they are given an opportunity to "have a say" – inclusiveness is key!!

If there was one thing you could change in MH&A what would that be?

That we all speak the same ‘language’!!

What is your favourite “whakatauki – words of wisdom”?

Communication is inclusiveness, Inclusiveness is communication